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Nizam…

Oct 26th, 2012

Nizam…

The Nizam Diamond is believed to have been the most famous diamond in its time. There are tales about its size, somewhere between 340 and 400 carat. The story goes back to the rulers of Golconda, and is believed to have been found at Kollur Mine.

The precious stone gets its name from the Prince Nizam of Hyderabad.

The last Nizam Osman Ali Khan’s collection included 25,000 diamonds, pearls the size of quail eggs and the famed Jacob’s Diamond. A set of 22 Colombian emeralds weighing 413 carat was so flawless that no jeweller had the courage to set them.

One necklace comprised 226 diamonds weighing nearly 150 carat. It is said Osman Ali Khan used to handle his baubles as if they were marbles.

This diamond was lost and then discovered accidentally in 1870’s near Shamshabad by a local goldsmith, buried in an earthen pot.

Sources:
Wikipedia
Famous Diamonds

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