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Calling Hollywood producers!

Oct 9th, 2012

Calling Hollywood producers!

As with most of our legendary diamonds, the history of Le Sancy is a movie epic yet to be written and directed by a Ridley Scott or Steven Spielberg.

Le Sancy, a pale yellow diamond weighing 55.23 carat, was once reputed to have belonged to the Mughals of antiquity, but is more likely of Indian origin owing to its cut which is unusual by Western standards.

The shield-shaped stone comprises two back-to-back crowns (the typical upper half of a stone) but lacks any semblance to a pavilion (the lower portion of a stone, below the girdle or midsection).

The Sancy’s known history began circa 1570.Several sources state it belonged to Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. After the Charles died, in 1495 it passed to his cousin king Manuel I of Portugal.When Portugal was threatened to become under the Spanish rule, claimant D. António António, Prior of Crato fled the country with the bulk of the Portuguese Crown Jewels. He spent then his life trying to get allies to regain the Portuguese throne in the French and English courts, and to have sold then the diamond to Nicolas de Harlay, seigneur de Sancy.

Other sources claim that the diamond was purchased in Constantinople by de Sancy. He was popular in the French Court and was later French Ambassador to Turkey. Something of a gem connoisseur, de Sancy used his knowledge to prosperous advantage.

Henry III of France suffered from premature baldness and tried to conceal this fact by wearing a cap. As diamonds were becoming increasingly fashionable at the time, Henry arranged to borrow de Sancy’s diamond to decorate his cap. Henry IV also borrowed the stone, for the more practical purpose of using it as security for financing an army. Legend has it that a messenger carrying the jewel never reached his destination, but de Sancy (by then Superintendent of Finance) was convinced that the man was loyal and had a search conducted until the site of the messenger’s robbery and murder was found. When the body was disinterred, the jewel was found in the faithful man’s stomach.

De Sancy later sold the diamond to James I (successor of Queen Elizabeth) about 1605 when it is thought the Sancy acquired its name. It was described in the Tower of London’s 1605 Inventory of Jewels as “…one fayre dyamonde, cut in fawcetts, bought of Sauncy.”

The Sancy remained in England until 1669 when it was briefly possessed by the unfortunate Charles I (King of England, Scotland and Ireland) and then by his third son James II. Beleaguered after a devastating defeat, James took shelter under Louis XIV of France, a fickle host who tired of his exiled guest. Facing destitution, James had no choice but to sell the Sancy to Cardinal Mazarin for the reported sum of £25,000. The cardinal bequeathed the diamond to the king.

The Sancy was thus domiciled in France but disappeared during the French Revolution when brigands raided the Garde Meuble (Royal Treasury). As well as the Sancy, other treasures stolen were the Regent diamond, and the French Blue diamond which is known today as the Hope diamond.

The Sancy’s history is unknown from then until 1828 when purchased by Prince Demidoff for £80,000. It remained in the Demidov family collection until 1865 when sold to Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, an Indian prince, for £100,000. He sold it only a year later, creating another gap in its history. It reappeared in 1867, displayed at the Paris Exposition, carrying a price tag of one million francs; the gem then vanished again for forty years.

The Sancy next surfaced in 1906 when bought by William Waldorf Astor, 1st Viscount Astor. The prominent Astor family possessed it for 72 years until the 4th Viscount Astor sold it to the Louvre for $1 million in 1978.

The Sancy now rests in the Apollo Gallery at The Louvre, sharing attention with the likes of the Regent and the Hortensia.

Sources:
Wikipedia
Famous Diamonds

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